Theater at Monmouth, Woman of No Importance, by Oscar Wilde, Tuesday, July 22 at 7:30pm.   All are invited to a parish outing to the recently restored Cumston Theater in Monmouth to a play by the often outrageous Oscar Wilde presented by the resident acting company. The group rate tickets are $25 each. Checks may be made payable to St. Michael’s. Please sign up on the parish bulletin board. You may bring a picnic supper to eat ahead of time on the picnic benches on the side lawn. I’m also trying to arrange a discussion of the play ahead of time.

On the first two Sundays of July, the Rev. James Low, former priest at St. Michael’s, will be the preacher and celebrant. On the third Sunday of July we will host visitors from Trinity Church, Lewiston, who will be sharing worship with us. On the third Sunday of August we will worship with Trinity.  Our exchange is to better appreciate our mutual ministries

Dan+

By Paul Beaudette, Warden

So what is it? Is it the combined service where we are all together and you see faces you haven’t seen in a while? I liked Jan Sites’ comment about the kids. Since most of the children go to the 8:00 service, the ten o’clockers don’t see them as often. Jan’s comment was, “We need children in our services, it just makes it feel right. I love to hear the kids voices during the service.” Thank you, Jan. Having a 4 year old with me on Sundays, I wonder if she is disturbing others with her restlessness. But being all together as one congregation seems to be bringing us closer together. I like summers!I don’t know if I can put my finger on it, but there is something going on and maybe you can help me figuIMG_2384re out what it is. At Sunday’s combined service at 9:00 AM, there seemed to be an air of lightness and calmness, but energy as well. The Centering Hymn made me feel at home. The bulletin was different, the prayers seemed to hit home for me. The music, ah, the music. When you’re an eight o’clocker, you miss the music. It just feels so good to sing.

I also would like to thank Elizabeth Lowe for her wonderful story after the service regarding our prayers for her family member who had been sick. Additional gratitude offerings by Kenny Derboghosian and Joyce Baker were shared. These are the missions that are going on outside of our church walls and these are the missions we need to share with one another. We ARE making a difference in the world through our prayers. Let’s not ever stop that. Let’s continue sharing our stories, our families, our trials and tribulations as well as our successes and the things that bring us joy and happiness. So, from now on, let’s spend a few minutes during announcements to share these things with each other while we are all together.

In the last 3 months, we have seen a lot of funerals at St. Michael’s where we had not seen any for almost a year. These times can be rough for the families. We are grieving but lifting our hearts at the same time.  We are St. Michael’s Episcopal Church and we are strong, we are strong for ourselves and for each other. We are a part of a remarkable spiritual community, one with deep faith and love for each other and for all people.

Somehow, I think this will be a different summer, a great summer.

Prayer is a conversation with God, most of us would agree. We usually think it’s conversation we are meant to begin. Get out the right book, straighten up, say the right words, and wait for a response.   When there’s no response, we feel rejected, and walk away.   If we’re honest about the practice of personal prayer, there’s often silence on the other end.

If prayer is so great, why such silence. In personal conversation with another human being, if I’m the one always starting the conversation, if I always take the initiative and hear only silence, I’m not going to stay with it very long. I’ll walk away.

The gospel and worship reverses the initiative in prayer. We’re listening to a conversation that’s already going on. Rather than our starting the conversation, we’re invited to listen to one in progress. What do we hear? Silence, music, and love language: “Abba, Father, says Christ, I want them to know you as I have known you.

Hallowed be your name. Give us today our daily bread. Your desire be done.”

Dan+

Alcuin of York

Alcuin of York

At the Wednesday noon Eucharist we remembered Alcuin of the 8th century who gave us the Collect for Purity:

“Almighty God, to you all hearts are open, all desires known, and from you no secrets are hid: Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration of your Holy Spirit that we may perfectly love you, and worthily magnify your holy Name: through Christ our Lord.

Alcuin fostered schools and learning through parishes and Montessories, the only source of education in his time. Now we can go online for endless information. But is information really formation? How do we meet face to face, learn to trust, and employ what we know for love, service and justice? To foster such trust we’re not so far from 8th century Alcuin. Computers give information. Parishes, schools, and prayers foster formation.

Dan+

Sermons are now being posted – see the Sermon menu in the left column.

Vestry Minutes are also included under Vestry in the left hand column menus

Dear Friends,

Richard Rohr, a Franciscan teacher and priest, says we develop a Loyal Soldier early in life. The soldier is that part of our conscience that seeks to please those at the top of the social order and accommodate those in power – at home, in school, or in the community. We employ the soldier to make early choices, and keep enemies at bay.

Later, as we mature, we do well to ask the soldier to step aside. Then we can listen to others we may at first have rejected. To move into maturity is to open the door to forgotten and overlooked parts of our lives and communities. “The stone we have rejected becomes the chief cornerstone,” Peter says of Christ. To worship and pray is to enter the wider conversation. Our Loyal Soldier broadens to a higher and more inclusive authority. Thanks be to God for all the ways the church supports our growing into maturity.

 Dan+

The Finance Committee this week talked about the costs of maintenance and improvements to our grounds and building. When you look at the things that need to be done, it all adds up to a lot of money. While we are all good at pointing out the conditions, be mindful that the costs for repairing and up-keeping some of these things is very expensive and increasing all the time. While pledging is good, it takes care of daily operations of the church, not capital improvements.

Here is a partial list of things that need to be attended to:

  1. Driveway needs to be re-paved.St. Michaels in the Summer (2)
  2. Undercroft needs new wiring and lighting.
  3. A lift needs to be installed for handicap accessibility.
  4. The carpet needs to be replaced in church.
  5. The roof will need to be re-done in 7-8 years.
  6. The vestibule at the side entry needs new flooring, painting.
  7. The sign needs an upgrade.

In today’s money, these items roughly estimated add up to about $85,000 to $100,000. Part of our outreach mission is to bring people into our parish and some of these will facilitate that happening.

The Finance Committee will develop a plan to fund these items which will undoubtedly include a capital campaign. So, please consider prayerfully how you might help this go forward.

It is with sadness that we mourn the loss of one of our long time parishioners, David Ehrenfried. We offer our love and heartfelt condolences to his wife Evelyn and daughter Sally. David passed away on Thursday morning, May 8th. Funeral services will be Tuesday, May 13th at 10:00 AM at St. Michael’s and visiting hours will be Monday evening also at St. Michael’s in the Washburn Room between 6:00 and 8:00 PM. All are welcome.

Spotted at the 8:00 AM service this morning were Carol & John Pike, recently returned from Florida. Welcome back Pikes!

And seen at the 10:00 AM service today was Peggy Gatchell. Welcome back from Florida Peggy and we’ll be happy to see you at vestry meetings too.

Anyone else you encounter returning from their winter siesta, please let us know at stmichaelsepiscopal@ne.twcbc.com.

Dear Friends,

Thanks to all who contributed to the walk through Holy Week and the glorious Easter, both Saturday Vigil and Sunday morning.  The acolytes attended Thursday evening with quiet care.  I was amazed how gracefully the many items that dignify our church were so gracefully removed to give us the bare sanctuary for Good Friday, then how they returned in the transition from dark to light at the vigil.  Thanks to the many readers, narrators, bringers of flowers, lighters of candles, and to those whose prayers and visits warm hearts and souls.  May we be open to God’s blessings in the new life of Easter in the weeks to come.

Yours in faith,

Dan+

St. Michael’s watercolor by Rev. Gary Price

Join us for Worship

Weekly service times
Holy Eucharist
Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Sunday School at 9 a.m.

Holy Eucharist
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m.

Where we are

St. Michael's Episcopal Church
78 Pleasant Street
Auburn, Maine 04210

207.782.1346
E-mail Us!

The Rev. Dan Warren,
Priest-in-Charge

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 20 other followers

Like Us on Facebook

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.